Ljubljana delivered.
Thank the Lord and the voters of the nation for freeing me of the dragon and those Teutophile rags at last!
In 1882, Germans lost their majority in Ljubljana city hall after 13 years of dominance. The illustration is an allegorical depiction of Ljubljana who has rid herself of “German” clothing (the top hat and frock coat), replacing it with traditional Slovenian garments. The dragon at her feet symbolises German sympathisers. Ljubljana Castle can be seen in the background.

Taken from the magnificent exhibition From Plague, Famine and War, Deliver Us, O Lord: Duchy of Carniola in Year One of the Great War, available online at Sistory.

Ljubljana delivered.

Thank the Lord and the voters of the nation for freeing me of the dragon and those Teutophile rags at last!

In 1882, Germans lost their majority in Ljubljana city hall after 13 years of dominance. The illustration is an allegorical depiction of Ljubljana who has rid herself of “German” clothing (the top hat and frock coat), replacing it with traditional Slovenian garments. The dragon at her feet symbolises German sympathisers. Ljubljana Castle can be seen in the background.

Taken from the magnificent exhibition From Plague, Famine and War, Deliver Us, O Lord: Duchy of Carniola in Year One of the Great War, available online at Sistory.

the Nagode trial, Ljubljana, 2 August 1947
(ph. Božo Štajer via the National Museum of Contemporary History)
The Nagode trial was a politically motivated trial against fifteen moderates, among them Črtomir Nagode, who had sought to restore Nagode’s liberal party after the Second World War in a Communist-dominated Yugoslavia. The Yugoslav authorities charged the group with treason, attempt to destroy the Yugoslav political system and acting as imperialist agents. Nagode and two others were sentenced to death by firing squad, the rest received lengthy prison sentences and were stripped of their civil rights.
The convictions were overturned in 1991 by the Supreme Court of newly independent Slovenia.

the Nagode trial, Ljubljana, 2 August 1947

(ph. Božo Štajer via the National Museum of Contemporary History)

The Nagode trial was a politically motivated trial against fifteen moderates, among them Črtomir Nagode, who had sought to restore Nagode’s liberal party after the Second World War in a Communist-dominated Yugoslavia. The Yugoslav authorities charged the group with treason, attempt to destroy the Yugoslav political system and acting as imperialist agents. Nagode and two others were sentenced to death by firing squad, the rest received lengthy prison sentences and were stripped of their civil rights.

The convictions were overturned in 1991 by the Supreme Court of newly independent Slovenia.

Politician Stane Kavčič speaks at a Socialist Alliance of Working People meeting, 2 November 1959
(ph. Miloš Švabić via the National Museum of Contemporary History)
The Socialist Alliance of Working People of Yugoslavia was the largest civic organisation in Yugoslavia, bringing together workers and citizens, the League of Communists, various social and political organisations and all organised socialist forces. Its goal, as stated in the Yugoslav constutition, was to guide social development on the foundations of the power of and self-management by the working class, to keep the working class informed, to involve youth in the political process, to monitor the those in power, and to discuss social questions.

Politician Stane Kavčič speaks at a Socialist Alliance of Working People meeting, 2 November 1959

(ph. Miloš Švabić via the National Museum of Contemporary History)

The Socialist Alliance of Working People of Yugoslavia was the largest civic organisation in Yugoslavia, bringing together workers and citizens, the League of Communists, various social and political organisations and all organised socialist forces. Its goal, as stated in the Yugoslav constutition, was to guide social development on the foundations of the power of and self-management by the working class, to keep the working class informed, to involve youth in the political process, to monitor the those in power, and to discuss social questions.